No.68 - Summer 1989


NOTES FROM THE COMMITTEE

An additional hazard facing battle-hardened enthusiasts is a new language introduced by BR, designed to confuse the commuter. The good news is that BR have eliminated signal failures. The bad news is that they have not eliminated signals failing – they have eliminated the expression as a reason for trains running late. Instead of crackling the words “this was due to a signal failure at Aldwarke Junction” over the Tannoy, BR staff
must now say “this was due to failure of electronic equipment”. So forget that over 1,000 failsafe signals broke down last year. They didn't.
There were over 1,000 cases of failure of electronic equipment.

The new BR language co-ordinator has also introduced the following
"improvements":

OLD                                                  NEW
Passengers                                        Customers
Stationmaster                                    Area Manager
Porters                                              Railmen
Buffet                                               Buffet facilities available
Tea/coffee                                        Hot beverages
Third Class/Second Class                  Standard
Southern Region                                Network SouthEast
Signals                                             Electronic equipment
Ten minutes late                               On Time

It is a fair bet that the language co-ordinator was transferred to that post from the BR accounting division where he did an equally inept job.
The Transport Secretary has refused BR permission to close the Settle-Carlisle line because of BR's weak financial case for closure. This has been a key element of the argument put against closure by the objectors
during the entire six-year closure battle. BR has even been told that their estimates for the repair and maintenance of Ribblehead Viaduct was way over the top. They were told that 6 years ago.
Whilst the Transport Secretary's long overdue announcement is very welcome, he did add that to cover the cost, BR would have to make economies elsewhere, and that could include the closure of other uneconomic routes. Tough if it's your line.

BR-IEFS
Which Chairman of the PENNINE is now known as the "Fat Controller".?
David Bladen has high hopes of son Alex eventually playing cricket for Lancashire. He has already enrolled him in the Fan-Clubs of the Red Rose's county stalwarts Gehan Mendis and Wasim Akram.
Robin Skinner pictured in full BR uniform, including topper, in the local Lincoln press recently – it was a killer; well, we nearly died laughing.
He denies that his next job will be at Homepride as a flour-grader.

President's Address: Geoff Bambrough recently invited to give a lecture to Boy Scouts on Railways. He asked our Treasurer what he could tell them. John replied “Tell them you've got flu”.

“Jugger” Channon": The soon-to-be-axed Transport Secretary, Paul Channon now agreed to EC “request” to allow giant Continental lorries onto British roads – 40 tonne trucks will be allowed in from 1999, giving us time to strengthen bridges. Has anyone told him a rail-link is being built to mainland Europe called the Channel Tunnel?

Investment: How many times have you heard recently the Government proudly announcing that investment in BR is at an all-time high and no project is turned down? It wouldn't be. The truth is that the Government is not
funding any investment in BR. All monies have to be raised by BR itself, through income.

Members. Slide Competition
Result of our recent competition, judged by all those in attendance was:
1st – Paul Wesley with 47379 "TOTAL ENERGY" on 6D71 13.00 Lindsay Oil Refinery – Leeds ORT at Stainforth.
2nd – Mick Stewart showing 37675/672 on 6B43 15.35 St. Blazey – Gloucester Speedlink passing Cockwood Harbour .
3rd – Andrew Watts showing 2xClass 50s on "Fellsman". at Ribblehead in April 1988
3rd – Rhys Jones with 8F 48151 on Lunds Viaduct on the Settle & Carlisle in October 1988.
A total of 64 slides were entered.


EDITOR'S NOTES
Welcome to the Summer edition of "TRANS PENNINE". The main news since the last edition is that the long threatened Settle-Carlisle line is not, after all, to close. Not only does this decision allow us all to enjoy this famous and magnificent stretch of line in the future, but it proves that there is some good in this Government.
By now, the new timetable is in use and this year's Summer edition encourages us all to "spot the HST" as there is no obvious way of telling which trains are HST or loco-hauled, as if it wasn't hard enough to read already.

CLASS 50s ARE TRANSFERRED
With the new Summer timetable from May 15th resulting in the Waterloo–Salisbury services being taken over by Class 50s in place of Class 33s, five Class 50s have been transferred across to the NSSA sector.
Nos 50005/7/9/16/45 are the locos involved and will make a welcome return to passenger services.

DATES FOR YOUR DIARY
June 24/25 Midland Railway Centre Diesel Weekend.

PENNINE QUIZ No.58
Well, an astonishing joint 1st by FIVE members makes the judging even harder. The lucky/unlucky five were Ian Shenton, M Bell, Peter Gardner, Barry Marshall and Robert Whittington of Sheffield. All scored 18 and
will each receive £2. Answers were:
1 – King Arthur; 2 – 1D Devons Road; 3 – 62740 "The Bedale"; 4 – 45616 "Malta G.C"; 5 – Par;
6 – Rosebush;  7 – 45137 "Bedfordshire and Hertfordshire Regiment"; 8 – 73B Bricklayers Arms;
9 – 50042 "Triumph"; 10 – D807 "Caradoc" and 6873 "Caradoc Grange"; 11 – Amble;
12 – 45519 "Lady Godiva"; 13 – 27003 "Diana"; 14 – 30449 "Sir Torre"; 15 – 3E Monument Lane;
16 – Wells; 17 – Hayle; 18 – Blackwell Grange; 19 – D848 "Sultan"; 20 – Sheep Pasture 17D.

PENNINE QUIZ No. 59

Picture the scene one Saturday afternoon in the future and Deltic's rule supreme once again. Five Deltic-hauled trains leave Doncaster at different times starting at 12.30 and following every 15 minutes until 13.30.
From the information given, discover each traveller's full name, the number of the loco he had for haulage, the time of his departure, his destination and whether his train was on time, early or late. CLUES –
1-The train to Retford departed before the train to Newcastle which departed before the train to London. Willy did not travel on any of the trains.
2-55002 and 55015 were not as quick as Steve's train. Coppitt's train was on time but Fred's was late on arrival.
3-Snappitt's train had departed last, his train being early on arrival. The only other train to be early being 55021 into Edinburgh.
4-55016 was quicker than 55009 which in turn achieved better time than 55015. Neither Bertie nor spotter travelled to Newcastle.
5-Neither Ray, Pennine nor Bawler caught the 12.45 to York.
6-55002 was quicker than Fred's train. The 13.00 train was not to Retford or Edinburgh, the destinations of Bawler and Spotter respectively.
7-55009 was the second train to depart which was before Ray's train, which in turn was before Steve's train.

BAWLER

PENNINE

COPPITT

SNAPPITT

SPOTTER

EARLY

ON TIME

LATE

55002

55009

55015

55016

55021

12.30

12.45

13.00

13.15

13.30

YORK

NEWCASTLE

LONDON

EDINBURGH

RETFORD

WILLY

BERTIE

STEVE

FRED

RAY

YORK

NEWCASTLE

LONDON

EDINBURGH

RETFORD

12.30

12.45

13.00

13.15

13.30

55002

55009

55015

55016

55021

EARLY

ON TIME

LATE

Answers to the Magazine Editor by 15 August 1989 please.

CHANGING TRAINS AT BOBADILLAS
by P. Slater


Bobadillas was an isolated junction where I changed trains during a long railway journey to the south of Spain. As far as I remember there was no town or village there, just an olive-oil factory, an engine-shed, outside which stood many examples of derelict-looking Spanish steam power, and a station. It was the interchange point between the line from Cordoba to Malaga and the one from Granada to Algeciras.
It was in the summer of 1962 when I changed trains at Bobadillas. I had travelled from Madrid on a Malaga train, hauled first by steam, then by an electric locomotive, then from Cordoba by steam once more. It was
mid-afternoon when I arrived at Bobadillas and blazing hot, the train was slow and packed with people, and the landscape beyond the carriage windows looked arid and alien to my eyes, more like the Mexico of the cowboy films than the England I knew.
Beyond Bobadillas the journey was more pleasant. The Algeciras train was less crowded, the heat grew less and the light not so harsh as evening came on, and the line climbed a long gradient into upland county, where a welcome breeze blew through the open windows. I heard the 4-8-0 at the head end working stentoriously as it lifted its train into the hills. An hour later over the other side of the summit the train wound its way down a long narrow valley between rocky peaks. I stood in a doorway, now nearly at journey's end, looking out at this beautiful and exotic country where I was to spend the next three weeks at a student's work camp, and listening to the 4-8-0's melodious chime whistle echoing off the sides of the defile.
The camp was a most interesting experience but I was quite glad when the time came for me to catch the morning train from Algeciras at the little station down in the valley and start my long journey home. Orange
trees grew on the platform, and the train was hauled by another of the sweet-voiced 4-8-0s. Soon I was on my way north through the mountains.
Once again it was the hottest part of the day when I had to change trains at Bobadillas. On the crowded platform I thankfully paid a few coppers for a drink from the capacious jar carried by a water-seller; during my journeys I sometimes saw a locomotive crew refreshing themselves from a similar jar in their cabs, and from my own thirst I could imagine how unpleasant driving and firing a steam engine must be in the torrid Spanish summer, the heat from the firebox adding to the glare of the sun.
A train for Malaga arrived, double-headed by two tall-chimneyed old Franco-Belge 4-8-0s, then the Madrid train was drawing in behind a pair of big modern locomotives also of the 4-8-0 type. I got on board, amid a
throng of other travellers, and before long the train was moving northwards through the sweltering afternoon, the compartments and corridors packed with sweating humanity, and soot from the locomotives' exhausts raining in through the windows.
There was no bar on the train, but a vendor of cheap fizzy drinks plying the corridors found plenty of custom. It was more like a scene from a Third World country than my usual rail journeys. I had to show my passport to a man in plain clothes, but with an official-looking badge which could only be seen when he flipped up his jacket lapel, later I learned that he was a member of General Franco's secret police who regularly checked the documents of rail travellers.
Soon Bobadillas was left far behind.


REVIVAL AT RUSHDEN
by P Slater
During a recent visit to my mother I had a look at the old station in Rushden, my home town. The last goods trains ran to Rushden twenty years ago, and the last regular passenger trains ten years before that, but the station has remained intact, and has now been restored as the Rushden Railway Museum. A short length of track has been installed alongside the single platform, and at the time of my visit there were steam and diesel shunting locomotives to be seen as well as a crane and some wagons.
The Midland signal box from East Langton in Leicestershire has been erected on the platform as Rushden, and one of the station rooms has been laid out as a museum, with many interesting exhibits. I was fascinated by an old notice-board from Wellingborough engine-shed, showing details of locomotive workings; I would guess that the board dated from the early 1950s, as among the locomotives listed were some Beyer-Garratt's, which were replaced by BR 9F 2-10-0s on heavy goods workings from Wellingborough well before 1960.
Rushden was the one intermediate station on the branch from Wellingborough to Higham Ferrers, and during my childhood – and, no doubt, for many years previously – it was served by a steam push-pull train. In the 1950s the almost invariable formation was a two-coach set pulled to Higham Ferrers by an Ivatt 2-6-2T and pushed back to Wellingborough, but occasionally there was a change of motive power, and I can remember a BR
Standard 2-6-2T an ex-Lancashire & Yorkshire 2-4-2T and a Fowler class 3 2-6-2T putting in an appearance at different times as well as a representative of an earlier generation of Midland branch locomotive 0-4-4T No.58091.
In addition to the push-pull, there were occasional excursions starting on the branch and for many years a Saturday through working to Leicester was hauled from Higham Ferrers by a tender-first “Black 5” 4-6-0.
The branch was closed to regular passenger traffic on 15 June 1959, although summer excursion trains continued for a few more years. The push-pull actually ran for the last time on Saturday 13 June 1959 and the
occasion remains one of my most vivid memories of adolescence: the heat-wave weather conditions typical of that summer, the nostalgic ride which my brother and I took on the evening train from Rushden to Higham Ferrers and back, and the far-off sounds of whistles and detonators carrying to our home through the warm night as the very last train ran, added up to make an unforgettable experience. A double push-pull set was used for the final day's workings, with BR Standard 2-6-2T No.84007 sandwiched in the middle.
The lightweight branch goods trains continued to run for another ten years, supplemented in the late 1960s by more substantial trains of iron concentrate. At first a variety of steam power was used and some of my earliest attempts at railway photography were made on the branch good engines.
BR Standard 4-6-0 No.75058 was a regular performer at one stage, and more exotic subjects for my camera included class 7F 0-8-0 No.49444 and class 04 2-8-0 No.63742. I have vague memories, unsupported by
photographic evidence of a large number of ex-LMS and ex-LNER tender locomotives at work on the branch goods trains, and I assume that they were running-in after repairs at Wellingborough shed. Class 26 and 27
diesels had taken over the branch goods workings by 1964, and they continued operations until the line closed completely in 1969.
Some of my most enjoyable journeys during my train-spotting days began with a ride on the push-pull from Rushden, and the branch has a special place in my affections; I am glad to see it undergoing a partial revival.

PENNINE OBSERVERS NOTES

Eastern Region

Melton Ross, east of Scunthorpe, is a good spot to view Class 37s and Class 56s on steel and iron ore trains. Within minutes on March 23rd 37258/5 headed up an iron ore while 37002/377 headed in the opposite direction.
Noted at Immingham on April 9th were 08439/478/508,20068/89/226, 31154/233/403,37002/106/202/258/275/377, 45130, 47223/277/402/412.
97545 arrived at Sheffield on April 15th on a footex but it is not reported where from.
Seen at Healey Mills on April 10th were 37274 on coal, 37378, 31166 light-engine and 56094 on MGR empties.
Two Rugby League Final specials from Hull to Wembley on April 28th and 29th were hauled by 47555, while 47436 was seen at Doncaster on May 6th on the "Lakes Express" from Peterborough to Carlisle. The same day saw 47501 returning to London carrying Arsenal supporters home from Middlesborough.
May Day saw an additional Sheffield-St.Pancras(18.02) hauled by 97545. The first Summer Saturday of 1989 didn't pass without one or two problems. 31464 failed at Tapton Junction, Chesterfield on the 09.17 Paddington-York, its run from Birmingham obviously proving too much in the warm weather, and was pushed to Sheffield by the following 10.42 Skegness-Sheffield hauled by 47413. The defunct Class 31 was replaced there by 31107. 47256 worked the 12.52 Skegness-Leeds and 47522 the 13.13 Skegness-Sheffield whilst the 10.20 Skegness-Leeds was hauled by 31469.

Midland Region
Class 56s and 58s are the mainstay of MGR trains in the Nottingham area although pairs of Class 20s can still be seen. Noted on March 17th at Pinxton were 56020 and 58046 on MGR's with 58033 at Langley Mill. 08597,
20086/217,25209,37213 and 58031 were at Toton. 20034/42 were at Nottingham on a parcels train and 31221/233 and 31223/249 on oils. 08623 was Yard pilot at Beeston and 08536/428,45121/135/6 were at Derby.
Class 90s are becoming very popular for reported sightings and on April 1st 90003 headed the 16.30 Manchester-Euston and 90010 the 17.30 Manchester-Euston. Two days later saw 90014 head the 14.30 Manchester-Euston with 08838 seen at Longsight and 08669 at Trafford Park.
A major highlight of the Spring was the use of the Settle-Carlisle line for diverted WCML services at weekends in March.
Predictably services were predominantly in the hands of Class 47s and on March 14th
No's 47431/440/442/471/483/489/531/2/7 were used. March 11th saw 47441/456/471
47488/512/527/532/608/612 amongst the locos used, but unusually 47117 headed the 12.10 Glasgow-Manchester and 47365 the 12.37 Glasgow-Euston.
March 18th found 47439/441/3/7/456/570/590/605/659 used with 47406 heading the 06.34 Carlisle-Leeds and 47413 the 08.25 Leeds-Carlisle.
Class 37/4s are finding their way southwards after being displaced from Scottish services by Sprinters. 37411/425 were at Buxton on April 15th with the latter being used to bank the 15.40 Hindlow-Oakleigh, hauled
by 47605.
37073 provided power on May 6th for a footex from Birmingham to Derby. The same day found 85023 heading the 10.29 Birmingham-Liverpool and 85032 the 13.26 Birmingham-Wolverhampton. 85006 and 81007 also   worked passenger services that day.
The Midland held an Inter City Diesel Day on Sunday 21st May with loco-hauled services running from St. Pancras-Leicester, some via Corby. Locomotives used were 20145/228,37058/66,33021/2,47347,56017 and 58050. An added bonus was D9000 which was on show at St. Pancras.
It has been rumoured that trials will take place with a Class 31/4 and 3 vehicles on the Manchester-Buxton line. There have been numerous problems with the Sprinters on that line.

Southern Region
The return of Class 50 No.50049 from its guise of 50149 has brought a crop of sightings. One of the earliest was March 20th when it worked the 09.40 Plymouth-Portsmouth paired with 47587 as far as Exeter, continuing
forward alone.
The following 50s were seen on Waterloo-Exeter services between March 16th and 20th: 50003/17/18/21/25/28/41/4/8/50. 47587 was also seen.
Although the majority of services are Class 50 hauled, the odd Class 33 working, together with the Class 47 diagrams intermingle. On March 19th 33118 worked the 17.00 Waterloo-Exeter with 33111 the 11.10 Waterloo-
Exeter on March 24th.
The 09.40 Plymouth-Portsmouth had 50048 in charge on March 17th and 50049 on the 20th, whilst the 12.03 Portsmouth-Plymouth was headed by 50041 on the 19th and 50018 on the 20th.
A concentrated Waterloo-Exeter bash" on April 23/24 found 50049 head the 09.35 Exeter-Waterloo, 50041 the 08.25 Basingstoke-Exeter, 50027 the 09.00 Waterloo-Exeter, 50041 the 12.27 Exeter-Waterloo, 50003 the 11.00 Waterloo-Exeter, 47473 the 14.27 Exeter-Waterloo, 50030 the 14.00 Waterloo-Exeter, 47587 the 16.07 Exeter-Waterloo, 50028 the 16.10 Plymouth-Waterloo and 50049 the 17.00 Waterloo-Exeter on the 23rd, whilst
the 24th found 33119 on the 08.39 Yeovil-Waterloo, 50028 the 07.00 Waterloo-Exeter, 50030 the 08.11 Exeter-Waterloo, 50044 the 09.10 Waterloo-Exeter, 47587 the 09.40 Exeter-Waterloo, 33109 the 10.10
Waterloo-Tilsbury/14.35 Gillingham-Waterloo, 50041 the 09.40 Plymouth-Portsmouth, 50003 the 11.10 Waterloo-Exeter, 50048 the 11.59 Portsmouth-Plymouth, 50028 the 12.20 Exter-Waterloo, 50049 the 13.00 Waterloo-Exeter, 33101 the 14.10 Waterloo-Salisbury, 50044 the 14.17 Exeter-Waterloo and
50030 the 15.10 Waterloo-Exeter. May 6th found 33119/106 heading the 07.01 Waterloo-Meldon SEG.
Railtour while 50048 worked the 08.17 Exeter-Waterloo, 50049 the 09.10 Waterloo-Exeter, 47651 the 09.40 Plymouth-Brighton to Salisbury, 50041 the 11.10 Waterloo-Exeter, 50002 the 13.10 Waterloo-Exeter, and 33115 on the 12.10 Waterloo-Gillingham and the 14.35 Gillingham-Waterloo.
The first Sunday of the new timetable and Waterloo-Salisbury/Exeter services in the hands of Class 50s (in theory) found three of the newly transferred members in action. 50008 worked the 10.24 Salisbury-Waterloo
and 15.00 Waterloo-Exeter, 50007 worked the 11.25 Paignton-Waterloo and 50009 the 10.00 Waterloo-Salisbury and 21.24 return. 47452 worked the 09.28 Exeter-Waterloo proving all 47s haven't left the line yet. The stabling point at Salisbury, for long the resting place for 33/1s held 50029/50.

Western Region
March 17th found 50033 head the 10.35 Paignton-Paddington and 47589 the 14.32 Paddington-Newbury/15.50 return. The previous day saw 50024 at Exeter on an unidentified parcels train. Also on this date 47583 headed
the 09.35 Cardiff-Paddington HST working arriving 30 minutes late.
Paddington-Oxford/Newbury services on this date were worked by 50023/26/30/1/2/3/4/5/40.
Noted at Laira on March 17th were 08641/840/944,47586,97652,
50002/10/12/14/22/29/42/47. 50021/49 were at Exeter. March 19th found the 16.20 Plymouth-Paddington in the hands of 50040. The next day saw 37425/2 unusually at the head of a Foster Yeoman stone train to London.
Easter weekend in the West Country found the additional services overwhelmingly in the hands of Class 47s. Monday March 27th found 47559 working the 15.55 Paignton-Paddington additional, 47558 the 14.10
Penzance-Paddington additional. Also 47652 worked the 09.18 Manchester-Plymouth and 17.00 Plymouth-Birmingham. 47543 headed the 07.40 Paddington-Plymouth and 15.10 return.
The Paddington-Hereford service has seen only occasional interlopers of the Class 47 variety in recent weeks with 50046 on the 13.45 Paddington-Hereford/18.00 return, and 50031 the 16.15 Hereford-Paddington
on April 9th, 50040 on the 13.45/18.00 and 50024 the 16.15 service on April 16th, and 47583 the 13.45/18.00 and 50034 the 16.15 service on May 7th.
The 10.02 Paddington-Plymouth sees fairly solid Class 50 power at its head. 50036 worked the train on April 16th and 50050 on May 7th.
Get your Class 33s here, where? Well, Taunton, of course. 15.30 hrs on April 26th saw 33035/15 heading west on ballast empties and 33110/117 east loaded. Only five minutes earlier 47284 worked up on a freight.
Class 50s Nos 50008/15/43 were all on Exeter stabling point the same day, before No 43 paired 50003 on the 22.15 Exeter-Laira ECS. The next day saw 50042 heading from Meldon Quarry to Exeter.
The last week of the Class 50 diagrammed 09.40 Paddington-Birmingham saw 47500 in charge on May 8th, an unidentified Class 47 on the 9th, and 50035 on the 11th.
A ten-hour stint in the Didcot area by a keen member on May 13th found most Paddington-Oxford services in the hands of Class 50s with a couple of Class 47 interlopers, Nos 47440 and 47598. Class 50s noted were
50025/35/36/37/40/6. 47620 worked the Paddington-Stratford-Marylebone Inter City charter train whilst 47583 headed a westbound additional and returned ECS. Green Class 37, No 37350 partnered an unidentified member
on a westbound oils while 37174/263 worked east on ballast, returning light. Green Class 47, No 47500 worked the 06.54 Manchester-Paddington and 12.40 Paddington-Birmingham return.
Another westbound ballast was worked by 47623, returning light. 47567 worked the 3A12 06.45 Swansea-Old Oak Common vans and 37248/220 headed the Langley-Robeston oil empties. An unusual pairing of 31435/56039 worked westwards light-engine and 47289 worked 4M60 12.35 Southampton-Birmingham
Freightliner.
Other liner trains, the 07.10 Coatbridge-Southampton and 12.20 Birmingham-Southampton were headed by 47144 and 47095 respectively. Quite a variety of motive power and trains still to be found here.
On 15th April 47658 hauled race goers on the Paddington-Newbury Racecourse special, and return. This service has occasionally been Class 50 hauled in the past.

For information included in the above section, we are indebted to Messrs
Slater, Dewing, Gossan, Caddick, Wesley (Paul) and Sanderson.

BR Seeks advice from Racing Expert


The PENNINE's Treasurer, John Sanderson, renowned county-wide for his horse-racing knowledge, has been asked by British Rail to provide details of fixtures at Southwell Racecourse, near Newark, to facilitate the
carrying of passengers to Rolleston Junction station, which adjoins the track. The racecourse is to be provided with the North of England's first all weather course, guaranteeing racing throughout the winter months uninterrupted by the conditions.

Swinton Station
Work is progressing speedily on the construction of a "new" station at Swinton in South Yorkshire, and the re-instatement of Swinton curve linking Swinton with Mexborough. As a result of these improvements BR has
applied for closure to passenger trains of the section of line from Aldwarke Junction to Mexborough East, with all Doncaster bound trains using the new curve. The improvements will be completed within a year.

PENNINE RAILWAY SOCIETY – MEETINGS/TRIPS LIST – JUNE-SEPT 1989

Meetings List No 4 June-September 1989 Robin Skinner

All meetings held at the Corporation Brewery Taps, Cleveland Street, Doncaster at 19.45 for a 20.00 prompt start.

Tuesday 20 June
Illus John P Sanderson, Slide Show "A Midsummer Night Madness".

Tuesday 4 July
Illus. Tony Caddick, Slide Show "Independence Day". Travellers Tales.

Tuesday 18 July
Illus. Uncle David Whitlam, Slide Show

Tuesday 1 August
Illus. Reverend Andrew J Watts (Bishop of Balby) Power from the Pulpit. Slide Show from Above.

Tuesday 15 August
Illus. Tony Smith (the Retford variety)

Tuesday 5 September
Illus. Chris Tyas, Slide Show "Railways Larger than Life".

Tuesday 19 September
Illus. Dave Cawley, Slide Show

ALL WELCOME – BRING A FRIEND OR THREE


Fixtures List No 3 1989 PR4 David Whitlam


Wednesday 5 July 
Keighley & Worth Valley Railway
PR4-89/3 Evening Tour of line and installations by Railbus.
Members £2.50; Non-members £3.00. Meet Haworth Station 19.15.
Preserved bus will provide transport from Doncaster Station, departing 17.00 for those requiring it.

Bookings to David Whitlam enclosing SAE.
On booking, please indicate whether you will be travelling on the bus with us from Doncaster.