Trans Pennine

 

The Magazine of the Pennine Railway Society

 

No.122 - Winter 2002
 

Committee Briefs

 

 

 

 

 


 

Membership Fee Unchanged

 

With the magazine you will find a renewal of membership form.  We are pleased to announce that once again membership fees will remain unchanged at £4.50 for the full year.

We hope you will rejoin the Society in 2003 by simply completing the renewal of membership form and returning it with a cheque for £4.50 made out to the ‘Pennine Railway Society’, to our Membership Secretary, Tony Caddick, at the address shown on the form.

 

Annual General Meeting

 

You are invited to attend the Annual General Meeting which will be held at 12 noon on Sunday 12th January 2003 at the Salutation Inn, South Parade, Doncaster.

This is the opportunity for you, the members to have a say in how you wish the Society to be run.

It is also a chance to socialise with friends you may not have seen for some time.

 

Free 2003 Diaries

 

All members rejoining for 2003 will receive a free 2003 Pennine Railway Society pocket diary.  Yet another good reason for renewing your membership.

 

Social Meetings

 

Members are asked to note the social evenings arranged by Robin Skinner, held on the 1st and 3rd Wednesday of every month at the Salutation Inn, Doncaster.

The early 2003 programme is shown elsewhere in this magazine (NOTE there will not be a meeting on Wednesday 1st January). Curtains rise at 20.00 in our private room and all are welcome.
Entertainment guaranteed.

 

Morning Leaves

 

At the start of the winter timetable WAGN decreed all morning commuter services into London would run 3 minutes earlier.  This remains “until we are sure the leaf-fall period is over”.  Weirdly, evening services remain unchanged.

WAGN must believe that leaves know not to fall in the afternoon.

 

Buses to Stansted

 

Until Spring 2004 all Sunday trains to and from Stansted Airport will be replaced by an express coach service due to modernisation work on the West Anglia line.  The non-stop service will operate every 5-10 minutes with an estimated journey time of 90 minutes.

 

Problems for Virgin

 

Problems continue to arise for Virgin Trains.  The latest are:

The compensation battle with Railtrack over plans to shut parts of the London-Glasgow main line for 9 months for a £9 billion upgrading

The tilting trains designed to reach 140 mph will now reach only up to 125 mph, and the tilting mechanism will not be in use for a year

The headlight on its entire 78 train Voyager fleet may need replacing because they dazzle oncoming drivers

Trains have been taken out of service after being buffeted by waves on the Dawlish sea wall leaving a build up of salt deposits.

 

Arriva to lose Merseyside

 

Arriva is to lose its Merseyside Electrics franchise.  The shortlist of three includes two French companies and an Anglo-Dutch partnership.

 

Pennine Slide Competition

 

There were 48 slides entered in the competition held on 2nd October and after much deliberation by the judge, Robert Hay the result was as follows:

 

1st Tony Brown DMU 101692 crossing Marple Viaduct with the 16.34 Marple – Manchester Picc. service on 16/7/02

2nd Glenn Williamson 47840 descending Rattery Bank to Totnes with the 08.46 Penzance – Manchester Picc. on 16/8/02

3rd Chris Theaker 56090 south of Pontefract on a return York to Finsbury Park charter in June

 

The winning slide was taken using a Olympus OM1N camera with a 35mm f2.8 lens (1/500 at f5.6) and Kodak Elite Chrome Xtra Colour 100 film.

Congratulations to the winners and thanks to all who entered and to Robert Hay for judging.

Severn Valley Railway

 

About 20 members enjoyed a trip on the SVR and a guided tour of the depot at Bridgnorth on Saturday 12th October.  They travelled to Bridgnorth on the 11.45 departure from Kidderminster and the photo on the front cover shows ‘Black Five’ 45110 just before departure.  Many thanks must go to Chris Tyas for organising an excellent tour.

 

Pennine Shield

 

Our team have had a slow start in the Pennine Shield.  They came last in the first round of the shield at the home of the Dore Loco Group, Sheffield.  More like Wednesday, not United!

LATEST – Pennine also came last in the second round at the home of the South Yorkshire Railway Photographic Society.

Therefore the position after 2 rounds is Dore Loco Group 5 points, SYRPS 5 points and Pennine 2 points.  This means that the Pennine cannot win this year.

 

Acknowledgements

 

A big thank you to everybody who has contributed to the magazines I have produced in my first year in the job.  Keep your contributions coming, especially quizzes (I need one for the next magazine).

 

Next Issue

 

The Spring 2003 issue of Trans Pennine is due for publication on 19th March 2003.  Would contributors please let the coordinator have their information by Monday 3rd March – THANK YOU.

 

THE COMMITTEE OF THE
PENNINE RAILWAY SOCIETY
JOIN TOGETHER IN WISHING
ALL OUR MEMBERS, THEIR
FAMILIES AND FRIENDS
A VERY HAPPY XMAS
AND A 
PROSPEROUS NEW YEAR

THANK YOU FOR YOUR SUPPORT
AND FRIENDSHIP IN 2002

 

A Western Weekend

 

Tony Caddick

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One of the most glaring omissions of my railway-riding career (OK go on then – Bashing) was finally put right in October when I finally had a ride behind a Class 52 ‘Western’ on the main line.  I have heard countless tales from friends in the south west about these charismatic machines and was always envious when our chairman and treasurer recounted their epic journey from Penzance to Paddington behind a Western on the first stage of their Penzance to Wick in a day move many years ago.  Despite riding behind the class on a few preserved lines it is really not in the same league.  So when the opportunity to travel on Pathfinder Tours ‘Western Pilgrim’ from Crewe to Plymouth on 26th October presented itself it was too good to miss.

An early start (06.18) and late arrival (22.39) at Crewe dictated spending 2 nights in the plush surroundings of the Crewe Arms Hotel opposite the station – very posh.  So on a dark Saturday morning a rather shabby EWS liveried 47744 pulled out of Crewe Station on 1Z52 with its lengthy rake of Riviera Trains MK 1's.  Unfortunately, as we were booked in the First Class (very posh again) we would be at the rear of the train for almost the entire journey (as will be explained later).

Arrival in that well-known underground station in Birmingham on time saw the 47 detached and the gloomy atmosphere brightened by the appearance of D1015 ‘Western Champion’ in its golden ochre colour scheme.  Now I know that this livery still causes some argument in the enthusiast fraternity with many preferring maroon or blue but having only seen the livery in photographs I was won over – beautiful.

We departed New Street and its soul-less Voyagers on time and headed southwest for further pick-ups at Cheltenham Spa and Bristol Temple Meads.  The weather had brightened up considerably and sunshine greeted ‘Champion’ at Exeter St. Davids.  Now onto one of the highlights – the famous Dawlish sea wall stretch.  Glorious sunshine as D1015 hummed along the sea wall delighting the hordes of onlookers and photographers.  A more than creditable thrash (the noise could be heard at the back) over the infamous South Devon Banks was another highlight before the final tortuous last mile on the freight only line to Plymouth Friary.  From Friary a not quite so massive 09017 dragged the whole train including D1015 via the Lipson Triangle at Laira into Plymouth Station.  Although the 09 made a lot noise for 2.75 miles we would still be 11 coaches from the Western on the return journey.

An hour and a half in Plymouth (not recommended) was just enough time to stock up with provisions for the return journey and take some photos of the beast in the gathering gloom as the Diesel Traction Group team checked over D1015 for its second assault of the Devon Banks.  An on time departure (16.20) and an impressive climb of Hemerden Bank confirmed what fine fettle the loco was in and another splendid run along the sea wall saw us through Exeter as darkness fell.  A spirited romp up to Whiteball Tunnel and a very fast run through Taunton meant D1015 was now fully whipped-up and an early arrival at a now damp Temple Meads ensued.  Despite the rain a large crowd generated at the platform end as ‘Champion’ was detached from the train and hummed off into the night to rounds of applause.  (It later transpired that in a piece of railway history D1015 rescued a failed HST near Chippenham on her way back to Old Oak Common Depot – Beast!!)

A gleaming ex-works EWS liveried 47773 ‘The Queen Mother’ did not quite create the same level of excitement or enthusiasm but still managed to reach New Street 40 minutes early – a creditable achievement.  However the dead hand of Railtrack control now decided to show its hand in the shape of ‘Mr Patel’ in New Street Power-box who despite vehement protests from the Pathfinder stewards insisted on keeping the train to the booked time.  After viewing countless 323’s and Voyagers we finally left New Street at 21.26 with many gestures being made at the power-box before the inevitable stop/start run to Wolverhampton before thankfully more spirited running saw an on-time arrival back in Crewe for a quick sprint back to the hotel and ‘The Premiership’.

The following morning (Sunday) Pathfinder were staging the re-run of their infamous ‘Bone Breaker’ railtour to Clacton which made the national news over the August Bank Holiday when 58045 suffered a buffer stop collision causing the tour to be terminated.

Utilising the same stock as the previous day in the absence of the now withdrawn Class 58’s a pair of Class 56s had been requested and the tour was renamed ‘The Gratis Grid’.  On a wet and very windy morning a massive pair of EWS liveried 56038/041 headed south at 08.50 for the first port of call at Stafford where we had managed to leave the tour (as arranged with the stewards) and head back north to Crewe for a spot of West Coast dragging.

However the dire weather forecasts of the previous 2 days were now proving correct as the ‘Grids’ stormed south in ever increasing winds.  We eventually ground to a halt a couple of miles north of Stafford in a howling gale and stood while various announcements were made about the severity of the weather further south.  With tales of wires down at Penkridge and all trains stopped in the Birmingham area it came as no surprise when the announcement was made that the tour would be terminating at Stafford.

When we finally arrived in the wild, windswept and wet station the powers that be wanted to terminate the train and leave it in the sidings until the storm abated but thankfully the stewards with the help of a willing driver and crew managed to obtain permission to run-round and head back north to Crewe.  However, due to the extremely dangerous weather conditions we would only be allowed to run at 15 mph maximum speed.

Therefore at 11.00 we finally headed back from Stafford as 1Z99 (Stafford/Crewe special working) conveying some ordinary passengers too as by this time the whole system had ground to a halt.  After a long delay near Norton Bridge and one or two stops to clear debris off the line we finally arrived back at a deserted Crewe at 3.00 pm after relieving the catering crew of all their sandwiches for free.  No one on the train seemed too upset, the Pathfinder stewards did a marvellous job in keeping us informed and we were the only train running for miles around – a day to remember.
With no trains at all running from Crewe (and no replacement buses either) Uncle David’s car whisked us back through roads strewn with leaves and branches where I arrived back in Sheffield at 6.00 pm to find all Midland and Virgin services abandoned or delayed but miracles of miracles Arriva Trains to Doncaster running on time – you see Arriva, you can do it when you want!!!
So at the end of a hectic and exciting weekend I had my first mainline Western and really enjoyed the experience. I can certainly now see why they still have such a devoted following after all these years. Although the mighty Deltics still remain my firm favourites, the 52’s are not far behind. Here’s hoping one comes up north for a run in the future. And the next time I am on a big Class 87 flying between Crewe and Stafford in 20 minutes I shall think of the massive pair of 56’s battling against storm force winds and that so and so Michael Fish.
Thanks to the Pathfinder Stewards (especially our own Andrew Watts), The Diesel Traction Group and Messrs Nicholson, Theaker, Andrews and Whitlam for helping endure a weekend that could have turned pear-shaped.

On the Track of The Lough Swilly Railway


by Paul Slater

 

 

 

 

 

 


On holiday in Ireland for the sixth time, Chris and I headed for northern Donegal. As well as being an area of great natural beauty, this part of Ireland is where folk musicians Clannad grew up. Chris and I have been fans of their music for years and after reading the autobiography of Maire Brennan, Clannad’s lead singer, we were interested in visiting the places she mentions.
Northern Donegal is now completely without railways, but it was not always so. Maire Brennan tells how her grandfather, who was a county councillor and also the village schoolmaster, had campaigned to keep the local railway open. This was the Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway, the most extensive and far-flung of the Irish three-foot gauge systems. In its heyday it ran from Londonderry to Letterkenny and then on around the north of Donegal to Burtonport on the west coast, with a longer branch from Tooban Junction to Buncrana, on the eastern shore of Lough Swilly, and on to Carndonagh. The Lough Swilly Railway was notable in using locomotives that have been described as the giants of the narrow gauge, 4-8-0s and 4-8-4 tanks, and also for being the scene of a serious and very unusual accident. On a wild day in January 1925 a train of the Lough Swilly Railway was actually blown off the line while crossing the Owencarrow viaduct in a furious gale, with the loss of several lives. L.T.C. Rolt’s classic book “Red for danger” contains a description of this accident, but I think I first read about it years earlier, in a railway book I had as a boy, and the account made a memorable story. To prevent a repetition of the accident, the railway took the unusual step – but it was not unique – of installing an anemometer at one of its stations, Dunfanaghy Road, and when the wind speed reached a certain level, trains were stopped.
The name of the Londonderry & Lough Swilly Railway lives on in the Lough Swilly bus company, whose vehicles are a common sight in northern Donegal. The railway itself, however, has long gone. The last section closed in 1953, and the western end of the line ceased to operate some years before that. While we were in the area I intended to look for remains of the Lough Swilly Railway, but after a lapse of half a century I was not hopeful of finding much. On our way north from Dublin, we learned from the proprietor of the Cavan & Leitrim Railway at Dromod that nothing had been preserved from the Lough Swilly Railway, but that the course of it was still visible in places; and at the museum at Donegal station I was fascinated by many photographs of Lough Swilly locomotives and read an account by an enthusiast of a ride on one of the last gods trains to Gweedore. The Lough Swilly Railway appears briefly in one of my historical videos; 4-6-0 tanks, still beautifully kept, with dark green paint pristine and brass work gleaming, are seen shunting at Tooban Junction in the line’s final years.
Gweedore, Clannad’s hometown and the place where I had intended to stay during our holiday, proved elusive, and we actually stayed at Falcarragh. We learned that Gweedore is only the name of a district, and where the maps show it, there is nothing but a scatter of buildings in bleak open country, the town – such as it is – being several miles away on the coast road. We found no trace of Falcarragh and Gweedore stations, no signs of the railway at its western end, and no indications at Burtonport that this had once been the terminus of the line. I recognised the low cliffs by the harbour that I had seen in the background of photographs f locomotives at Burtonport, and we amused ourselves trying to decide where the railway had once been.
We had more success when we followed the main coast road eastwards from Falcarragh. Two masonry piers, looking like the remains of an old railway viaduct, stood beside the road at the north end of Creeslough. There was a single arch a little further on, and the remains of a larger viaduct spanned the road several miles south of the town. Creeslough was mentioned in the account I had read of the ride on a goods train, it being the most important station west of Letterkenny.
We had decided that if we had a wet morning unsuitable for sightseeing, we would drive to Letterkenny, do some shopping, and visit the Donegal Count Museum. On our last day at Falcarragh, we did this. The guidebook I was using, although it was my late father’s and was forty years old, did not show the Lough Swilly Railway, as the line had already gone. The town plans in the book must have been even older, as the plan of Letterkenny showed the railway and the station. A very helpful lady in the Count Museum told me how to find the former station; it was now the ticket office for the bus station, there was an old warehouse next to it, and also – some distance away, along a road that followed the course of the old railway – what she called a “guard building” could still be seen. Also in the museum was an old map of the area, showing the railway at Creeslough and confirming that what we had seen were indeed the remains of viaducts.

Chris, interested in archaeology, shared my enthusiasm for tracking down the long-vanished railway.  The former station at Letterkenny still had ornamental iron supports for the platform awning, although it now faced a parking area for buses; nearby an old crane was preserved.  The “warehouse” was a typical railway goods shed, and, surrounded by modern shops, supermarkets and industrial units, the “guard building” looked like a crossing-keeper’s house.  On the way back to Falcarragh, the rain having stopped and the early evening sun shining golden, we managed to track the old railway for several miles.  At Barnes Gap, where the main road ran through a low mountain pass between Kilmacrenan and Creeslough, the line of the railway could be seen in the form of rock cuttings and embankments.  This had been the summit of the Lough Swilly Railway, and I could imagine the eight-coupled narrow-gauge locomotives toiling up the steep gradients.  The road passed under the larger of the two viaducts we had already seen, and then came to a bridge over the Owencarrow River.  The railway crossed the river a little way upstream, and a previous glance as I dove past had showed that the piers of the viaduct where the train had been blown off the line was still standing.  I took the next side road, a narrow lane that wound up and down.  I was pleased to find that it gave me a good view of the remains of the Owencarrow viaduct.

All the piers of the viaduct were in place; two of iron in the centre of the structure, the rest of stone, over a dozen in all, with two arches still remaining at the northern end.  We stayed for a few minutes looking at it before returning to the main road and continuing our journey.  Chris imagined a little steam train coming down the curving descent from Barnes Gap and crossing the viaduct, and I remembered the account of the accident I had read as a boy.  I felt very glad that after all these years I had actually found this place.  It seemed idyllic in the evening sunshine, but I could easily believe it could be bleak and desolate in winter.

At Creeslough we found the former station, half hidden in a cutting, but standing out as it was aligned on the route of the old railway rather than on a road.  It was a blue-and-white building, freshly painted and obviously being restored.  I knocked on the door of the nearest house and the occupier confirmed that it was indeed the old station I could see, but access was prohibited during the renovation.  I contended myself with taking a photograph from a distance, then returned to the car.  Soon we had passed the single arch and the piers we had first seen; near here Dunfanaghy Road station had stood, with its anemometer, then the course of the line turned to the west, well away from the main road.

Next morning we left Donegal, and as we drove south along the road to Letterkenny we looked for the last time at the remains of the Lough Swilly Railway; searching them out had given an extra interest to our holiday in the far north-west of Ireland.

 

 

The Last Time? 

 

by Chris Theaker

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There have been many reports, tributes, obituaries etc. in the railway press this summer as the Class 47’s ended their working days on passenger trains.

Forget about all the 47/8 farewells, for a select band of Pennine members the final goodbye was Friday 11th October, with 47703 hauling the 1F48 1730 St. Pancras to Sheffield.

Detailed below are a few of the ‘last time’ records achieved by this train.

The last regular weekdays Inter City train worked by a Brush 4 and a set of Mark 2’s.

The last daytime 47 hauled service train to leave London.

The last regular booked diesel loco hauled service on the Eastern Region (just).

The last booked loco hauled train to arrive on the famous Platform 5 at Sheffield (even though in the event due to late running it actually arrived on platform one).

The last loco hauled service train from London to Sheffield (but with a 47; funny how they outlasted the peaks.

The last ‘shove’ on a service train through Dore (Peter Hall seen viewing the train).

The last loco hauled service train to be announced at Chesterfield by that famous announcer’s voice from Sheffield.

The last ever engine in the northbound procession.

The last ever road show of bashers to greet a service train at Chesterfield.

And there was a first for this train.

It was the first ‘last 47 train’ to have no headboard, no big fuss, only a sprinkling of bellowers, just the odd journalist and only a handful of enthusiasts at journeys end.  Remember, that’s the way 47’s were treated by most bashers for the 30 plus years they spent working passenger trains through Sheffield so a low key end seemed appropriate.

Hopefully by the time this is published in December the Fragonset engines and stock will have re-emerged somewhere in Yorkshire.  If not see you on the 1719 Manchester Piccadilly to Holyhead for another last time in 2003.

 

A GHOST STORY FOR CHRISTMAS         

 

Chris Tyas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It was Christmas Eve night and signalman Jim Kirk was working in his box at Canal Bank Crossing. The fog had been drifting across the railway from the canal bank since it had turned dark shortly before four o’clock, it was now turned eight and Jim was starting to think about closing the box for the

holiday shortly after the last train at ten o’clock. Jim was looking forward to the next two days off and spending some time with his two boys Tom and Harry.

As he sat back in his armchair to look through the morning papers he thought he could hear a train in the distance coming from double locks swing bridge, but as nothing had been offered him from signalman O’Brien he thought he must be imagining it or it must be something else making the sound.

By now the noise of the engine was growing ever louder and he could even tell that it was the sound of one of the old class 37 locos that used to work in the area until quiet recently when they were replaced by those horrible American built class 66’s.

By now Jim was starting to get worried about whether there was a run away approaching, but surely he would have had some warning from signalman O’Brien. It was then that he heard the noise of the tractor engine approaching on the lane behind the box, but at least the gates were closed to road traffic so protecting the railway.

Jim looked out of the window to look for an approaching train but it was to foggy to see anything but by now the growling sound of the class 37’s engine was almost upon him, but surely the driver could see his home signal was set at danger.

It was then that Jim heard the crashing splintering sound of the crossing gates been smashed open by the tractor which must have failed to stop at the gates, perhaps the driver was expecting the gates to be open for him.

Then within seconds there was another crashing sound of crunching metal upon metal as the train must have hit the tractor on the crossing. But still Jim could see nothing through the fog.

Jim hurriedly gave the six bells occupation danger signal to both Double Locks Swing Bridge and Medge Lane box’s and remembering to put his block instruments to occupied. He then rushed down the steps of his box to try and see what had happened.

When he got down to the crossing gates there was no sign’s of any wreckage and the gates were untouched in the closed position to road traffic, it was then that Jim noticed that everything had gone quiet, and there was no sound what so ever apart from the ringing of the telephone coming from the signal box.

He ran back to his box and answered the telephone; it was Signalman Scott at Medge Lane box who wanted to know what the hell was happening. As Jim explained what he had heard Scotty told him to ring O’Brien at Double Locks and explain that it was a false alarm and then ring him back and all would be revealed.

Scotty told Jim that on Christmas Eve in 1962 a local farmer named John Archer had been out to check on his cattle before heading back to Enterprise farm to prepare things for Christmas on the farm. It was a very foggy night just like tonight and his mind was probably on other things rather than on what he was doing.

At the same moment one of the new diesel hauled trains was approaching Canal Bank Crossing, driver McCoy had not long been passed out on these new engines and was trying to see how well they would perform on an heavy freight train, so he had the power controller wide open as he had a clear road ahead as the signal at canal bank crossing was in the off position.

It was then as he was almost on the crossing that farmer John Archer crashed through the gates and driver McCoy had no time to react as his train smashed into the tractor pushing it down the embankment and into the canal. The train was almost at Medge Lane before it came to a stand.

Farmer Archer had been killed instantly but even if he had not been it was doubtful if he would have survived in the cold water of the canal.

So had Jim fallen to sleep in his chair, and had it all just been a bad dream or was it really the ghost train of Christmas Eve 1962.

 

Robin’s Review

 

No 19 Rail News.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rail News nowadays promotes itself under the slogan ‘The Independent Newspaper for people in The Rail Industry’.

Rail News printed in tabloid newspaper form is published monthly and consists of 56 pages and is priced at 95p.  Subscriptions for one year are £10.80.

The newspaper has its origins in the many railway company magazines and newspapers pre grouping through the big four to nationalisation and individual regional magazines of British Rail.  Until in 1963, British Railways launched a magazine which was to be seen as the voice of the staff rather than the organisation and called it ‘Rail News’.  It for most of its life up to 1996 was free.

Pennine members will remember at some of the more hospitable sheds and workshops visited we would be handed copies of Rail News which would be eagerly read on the journey home between known sighting points.

With privatisation came the demise of the British Railways Board and the last issue of its Rail News came in 1996.

In early 1997 a group of former senior BR managers including Cyril Bleasdale Formerly Divisional Manager Doncaster, and then Managing Director of Freightliners to name but a few distinguished positions held, bought the title Rail News from the BRB, and set up a small company called Rail News Ltd based in the East Side Offices above platform one at King's Cross station.

The first edition a small pilot edition of 4 pages appeared in February 1997, the first full edition appearing one month later in March 1997.  We are now on edition 69 in November 2002.

The paper is put together by a small group of about half a dozen staff and is very similar in format to its BR predecessor with almost all the same sections lots of News, Holidays, Sports Activities, Travel Restrictions and letters.

What is very different today is the inclusion of job vacancies which from all sorts of different railway companies make up a big component of the newspaper.  In BR days a separate vacancy list was usually published weekly.  Therefore advertising now makes up a large part of this small companies revenue.  As it now does for other publications like Modern Railways and Rail.

Rail News also compiles a directory of Railway companies which has grown to 16 pages and appears

annually as a supplement.

 

VERDICT: Rail News is a publication for Railway People (work or enthusiast) written by railway people portraying the good bad and the ugly in a balanced light.  There is serious news there is light news, people news, crosswords, competitions and lots of information.  But most of all it is impartial and upbeat throughout the railway industry.

The circulation of Rail News today stands at a very creditable 76,000.

To subscribe ring 023 9262 2534.

 

Pennine Observers Notes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Eastern Region

 

Recent sightings at Lincoln have been:

Oct 2 66138 on coal train

Oct 3 66247 on coal train

Oct 4 66150 on vans

Oct 8 66054 and 66086 on coal trains

Oct 9 66140 on vans, 66603 on oil train

Oct 10 60057 on oil train

Oct 11 60048 and 66606 on oil trains

Oct 14 66173 on vans

Oct 15 66039 on coal train, 66245 on vans

Oct 18 66072 on coal train

Oct 22 66087 on coal train, 66606 on oil train

Oct 24 66171 on vans

Oct 25 60027 and 66603 on oil trains

Oct 29 60027 and 66603 on oil trains, 66008 and 66190 on coal trains

Oct 30 66026 and 66226 on coal trains

Oct 31 66014 on coal train, 66607 on oil train

Nov 4 66228 on coal train

Nov 5 66076 on coal train

Nov 7 66085 on coal train

On 3 September, BT Police boarded the 13.27 Newcastle to London after the communication cord was pulled on leaving Newcastle.  A passenger was ‘arrested’ and escorted off the train which, with 9122, left 25 minutes late.

Seen at Wrawby Junction on 18 September were 56041, 56065, 66226 on coal trains, 60019, 60062 and 66053 on oil trains and 60068 on an iron ore train.

Noted in the Worksop area on 26 September were 08633, 66027, 66046, 66063 and 66215 at Worksop, 66075 on coal train at Shireoaks and 66553 on coal train at Woodhouse.

Major signal problems between Sheffield and Doncaster during the morning caused several trains to be cancelled.  Virgin Trains were either cancelled or diverted, not calling at Doncaster.

Noted at Fenwick Crossing on 12 October were 67017 and 90032 (light engines) and 60091 on an oil train.

On the same day observed at York, coming off the Scarborough line, were 37688 and 37503 top and tailing a Sandite train complete with a ‘Healy Mills Syphons on Tour’ headboard.

Seen at Cottingham on 20 October were 66129 and 66045 on ballast trains during renewal of the track.

Seen at Keadby on 26 October were 66128 on goods train and 60055 light engine.

Ex works 90034 was noted on East Coast workings for a few days from 9 October and GNER liveried 90024 was seen working on 16 November.

On 18 November there were delays of up to 2.5 hours to the services between Brough and Hull after a dog was killed on the line near Ferriby.  A week later there were delays of up to 3 hours when a woman committed suicide on the track near Hessle.

Noted at Tees yard on 26 October were 56129, 60035, 66021, 66168, 66188, 60013, 60030, 37503, 37065 and yard pilot 08655.

On the same day at Thornaby were 37510, 37683, 56085, 56108, 08806, 08813, 37055, 37139, 37672, 37673, 37680, 37515, 56039, 86416, 56127, 56090, 56088, 60056, 60066, 60050, 66170, 66034, 66209 and 66066.

Eighteen years earlier (5 February 1984), the locos on Thornaby were 08085, 08211, 08383, 08502, 08867, 31124, 31134, 31155, 31201, 31235, 31237, 31275, 31276, 31308, 31324, 37018, 37029, 37042, 37063, 37065, 37066, 37076, 37090, 37099, 37101, 37113, 37138, 37163, 40192, 47186, 47195, 47225, 47266, 47277, 47301, 47310, 47317, 47357.

Note 37065 is still hanging around Teesside after 18 years.  (Thanks to Andy Dalby for looking through his old records).

 

Midland Region

 

Locos used on drags, between Nuneaton and Birmingham NS, on 22 September were 47847, 47840, 47851, 47828 and 47749; also noted at Nuneaton was 47787 on the ‘Northern Belle’.  On the same day 66152, 66034, 66103, 66084, 92011 and 08709 were noted at Rugby.

On 24 September, 47488 was noted on the 09.33 Nottingham / St. Pancras and 47712 on the 17.25 St. Pancras / Sheffield.  The following day saw 47712 on the 09.33 and 47488 on the 17.25.  On the next day, 47488 was back on the 09.33 and 47712 back on the 09.33.

The following were noted working through Stafford on 5 October:

90003 11.27 Manchester / Milton Keynes

90004 12.27 Manchester / Milton Keynes

90039 12.45 Liverpool / Milton Keynes

90002 12.05 Milton Keynes / Liverpool

87002 13.32 Liverpool / Milton Keynes

57001 Southbound Freightliner

Noted at Longsight on 25 October (surplus to requirements) were 86207, 86214, 86222, 86244, 86248, 86151 and 86256.  On the same day, the Thunderbirds at Liverpool Edge Hill were 47851 and 57302.

Noted at Derby on 2 November were 66068 on goods train, 08899 shunting ecs and 08631, 08956, 31423, 31454 and 73212 in sidings.

 

Railtours and Charter Trains

 

Locos seen working on recent railtours have been:

Sep 1 (‘The Bone Idol’) 58024

Sep 7 (‘Cumbrian Fellsman’) 6201 ‘Princess Elizabeth’

Sep 7 (‘The Elizabethan’) 55019 ‘Royal Highland Fusilier’ and 60009 ‘Union of South Africa’ (the train did

not reach Edinburgh because the A4 failed at Chevington and the Deltic dragged the train back to London)

Sep 14  (‘The Queen of Scots’) 47726 and A4 60009

Sep 14  (‘The Soton Vinegar’) 37109/37174, 73136/73133, 60006 and 56129

Sep 21  (‘Spinning'' State IV’) 67018, 60076, 37668/37706, 92041, 56095 and 66015

Nov 17  (‘The Bicester Baseline’) 37308, 37057, 66244 plus MOD shunters 301, 302, 03144 and MOD 271 with brake van on rear of train

 

Preserved Railways

 

Locos working at the Severn Valley Autumn Steam Gala on 20 September were 45110, 46233, 46201, 5764, 7714, 60009, 7802 and 46443 on freight.

Locos working at the Ruddington Steam Gala on 26 September were 1163 ‘Whitehead’, 2996 ‘Victor’, 3809, 68088 and ‘Austin no. 1’.

Locos used at the Middleton Railway Steam Gala on 28 September were 67, 2103, ‘Brookes no. 1’, ‘Bellerophon’ and ‘Matthew Murray’ and also railbus DB998901.

Locos used at the Barrow Hill Diesel Gala on 5 October were 03066, 06003, 20096, 08868, 08809, 40135, 45060, 46035, 56006 and 66544.  Also on display outside the depot were 03094, 25067, 26011 and 31110.  Inside the Roundhouse were D300, 20168, 37087, 37254, D5300, 45105, E3003, 82008 and 84001 plus steam locos 45593, 2700 and 58850.

In the compound at Barrow Hill (open for guided tours) were 07005, 07012, 08390, D4092, D8056, 31105, 31107, 31407, 31411, 31412, 31417, 31433, 31460, 31524, 37072, 37079, 37095, 37142, 37201, 37227, 37331, 37194, 33035, 47053, 47229, 47375, 47628, 47707, 50002, 50023, D9500, E3035 and 85101 plus industrial locos GEC, NCB44, IMPALA and HNRC32.

 

Pennine Quiz No. 111

 

Geoffrey Bambrough

(The President)

 

 

 

 

 

1. What was the last shed code for Doncaster when it used to shed steam engines?

2. What was the last shed code for Barnsley when it used to shed steam engines?

3. What was the name of the now closed station at Barnsley where trains used to leave for Doncaster?

4. Which HST power car carries the name ‘Doncaster’?

5. Which HST power car once carried the name ‘The Grammar School Doncaster AD 1350’?

6. Which 19th Century railway chief mechanical engineer has a park named after him in Barnsley?

7. In which year did Doncaster Plant Works build its first locomotive?

8. Which was the 2,000th locomotive to be built at Doncaster Plant Works?

9. Which was the first Class 50 to emerge from Doncaster Works in large-logo style livery?

10. Who designed 71000 Duke of Gloucester?

11. What was the number of the first loco to reach the Severn Valley Railway in 1967?

12. Who designed the first six-coupled tank locos on the LSWR which appeared in 1876?

13. How many Class A4 Pacifics were built?

14. O. V. Bulleid designed the 0-6-6-0 ‘Leander’ class locos of which only one ever steamed but how many were built?

15. ‘William Whitelaw’ was the name of Class A4 no. 60004 but which A3 class loco carried the name until July 1941?

16. ‘Flying Scotsman’ has carried no. 4472 and no. 60103 but what was its original no. in 1923?

17. What was designer Sir Nigel Gresley’s other Christian name (clue – begins with H)?

18. The preserved B1 no. 61306/1306 Mayflower never carried this name in BR stock but which other B1 did?

19. What was the no. of the first steam loco to depart from Barry scrap yard for preservation in 1968?

20. Introduced in March 1961, in which month and year was D9000 named ‘Royal Scots Grey’?

21. Which 2 Deltics double-headed on the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway at the November 5/6 1988 ‘diesel weekend’?

22. Which 2 locos also double-headed forming a Class 24 / Class 25 combination at the same November 5/6 1988 event?

23. In which year was the blue prototype Deltic built?

24. Which production Deltic was the first to travel 2 million miles?

25. What was the works no. of D9015/55015 Tulyar?

26. Which name did 37027 carry until being removed in February 1987?

27. Where was 37012 Loch Rannoch named on 31st March 1982?

28. Who manufactured the turbo-charger fitted to 37/9 sub-class locos?

29. On what date did D400 operate on BR tracks for the first time with a test train from Vulcan Foundry to Chester and return?

30. No. 50041 attended which well-known railway event on 20/9/75?

31. On 11/6/84, during the evening, a Class 50 hauled a freight into Tinsley Yard before departing at 21.00.  What was the loco no.?

32. On what date did 50041 derail at Paddington hauling sleeper cars before landing on its side?

33. 50041 operated for the first time since the Paddington derailment on 4/1/85 by hauling which non-revenue earning train?

34. What was the original ‘D’ prefix no. of 47901?

35. Which Class 33 was cut up at BR Itchingfield Junction in July 1964?

36. When in NSE livery all such-liveried Class 50’s but one had a red background to their nameplate.  What no. was the one such loco with a blue    
      background?

37. To commemorate what anniversary was 50007 renamed from ‘Hercules’ and painted in dark GWR green livery in February 1984?

38. Which Class 56 became derailed at Copyhold Junction (near Haywards Heath) on June 14th 1988 subsequently taking engineers four and a

      half  months to recover?

39.  In which year was the South Wales allocation of      Class 50’s transferred to Plymouth (Laira) depot?

40.  How many ‘Peak Class locos carried names in BR     service?

41.  Which Class 46 was destroyed in a nuclear fuel        flask collision test on 17/7/84?

42.  Which diesel class was designed as a result of the      abandonment of the Class 38 project?

43.  The ‘Devon Belle’ with observation car was    introduced on the Waterloo – Ilfracombe service in         which year?

44. How many Class 40’s appeared as part of the original pilot scheme?

45. Which three Bristol built electric loco appeared at the West German railway exhibition between June 1 -12 1988?

46. 40122/D200 worked the Pennine Forty Farewell Tour from Euston on March 12th 1988 but what was notorious about its livery on this date?

47. Which EM2 electric loco was cut up by the Netherlands railway in November 1969 (ex BR no. please)?

48. Which 2 original Warships (NB not D800 series) were cut up at Barry Docks scrap yard?

49. How much did the tender of Gas Turbine loco no. GT3 weigh?

50. Who took over from Sir William Stanier as Chief Mechanical Engineer of the LMS?

 

Pennine Quiz No. 110
 

The Answers

 

 

 

 

1. A high wind blew a train off a viaduct

2. Amiens Street

3. Red

4. They are the only electric trains in Ireland

5. Inchicore

6. Westland Row

7. Blue

8. Ballinamore

9. No coal was exported to Ireland

10. The Irish Civil War or "The Troubles"

11. Kingsbridge

12. The Black Pig

13. C231

14. Wexford

15. Cork

16. Manulla Junction

17. Listowel and Ballybunion

18. Blennerville

19. Tipperary

20. Clonakilty

21. Manorhamilton

22. Slieve Gullion

23. Merlin

24. Kilkee

25. Peat

 

 

Pennine Quiz No. 110

The Winners

 

Joint 1st Ken King and John Dewing

3rd Ian Shenton

 

Congratulations Gentlemen – Your cheques will be in the post.

Come on members, let’s have a few more entries for Geoff’s quiz.

 

Pennine Meetings 2003

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

All meetings are held at the Salutation Inn, South Parade, Doncaster starting at 20.00 on 1st and 3rd Wednesday of each month.

 

SUNDAY 12th JANUARY at 12.00.

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING.

 

Wednesday 15th January.

Glynn Gossan

 

Wednesday 5th February.

Tim Bartlett

Timbo’s Travels.

 

Wednesday 19th February.

Ian Dinmore.

 

Wednesday 5th March

Members Slide Competition.

 

Wednesday 19th March.

Les Nixon.

40 years of railway photography part 2

 

Please Note there will not be a meeting on Wednesday 1st January 2002.

Also an apology to those of you who intended to see Rhys Jones show on Wednesday 20th November 2002, this meeting had to be cancelled at short notice due to the room at The Salutation not being available.  As you may know we get the room for free so from time to time we may have to move the meeting.  However on this occasion the Saturday before was too short notice to make other arrangements.  Although we hope we got in touch with everybody.

Those with mobile phones, if you give your number to Chris Tyas he has offered to send text messages when we have to cancel meetings in the future.

 

Acknowledgements

 

I would like to thank the following for their generous contributions to this issue: Tony Caddick, Andy Dalby, John Dewing, Peter Hall, John Sanderson, Paul Slater, Robin Skinner, Chris Theaker, Chris Tyas and Glenn Williamson.

 

Railtours around Corus Scunthorpe 2003

 

The Appleby Frodingham Railway Preservation Society will be operating railtours around the Scunthorpe site on the following dates in 2003.

 

 

Date

Short Railtour

Standard Railtour

Summer Brake Van

Winter Brake Van

Sat. 4th Jan.

 

 

 

11.00

Sat. 1st Feb.

 

 

 

11.00

Sat. 1st March

 

 

 

11.00

Sat .5th April

 

 

 

11.00

Sat. 3rd May

 

Diesel Day

 

 

Sat. 17th May

10.30

13.30

 

 

Sun. 1st June

 

13.30

 

 

Sat. 14th June

10.30

13.30

 

 

Sun. 29th June

 

13.30

 

 

Sat. 5th July

10.30

13.30

16.30

 

Sun. 13th July

 

13.30

 

 

Sat. 19th July

10.30

13.30

16.30

 

Sun. 27th July

 

13.30

 

 

Sat. 9th Aug.

10.30

13.30

16.30

 

Sun. 17th Aug.

 

13.30

 

 

Sat. 23rd Aug.

10.30

13.30

 

 

Sun. 31st Aug.

 

13.30

 

 

Sat. 6th Sept.

10.30

13.30

 

 

Sat. 20th Sept.

 

13.30

 

 

Sat. 4th Oct.

 

 

 

11.00

Sat. 1st Nov.

 

 

 

11.00

Sat. 6th Dec.

 

 

 

11.00

 

Short Railtours cover about 7 miles of the sites rail system and last for about 1.5 hours.

Standard Railtours cover about 15 miles of the sites rail system and last for about 2.5 hours.

Brake van rides visit some of the less accessible parts of the works rail system.

Summer Brake Van Tours last for about 2 hours.

Winter Brake Van Tours last for about 3 hours.

Diesel day will consist of a series of 7 mile tours using the society’s diesel locomotives and guest locomotives, further details available early 2003 from AFRPS.

 

Children under 12 years of age are not permitted on brake van tours but accompanied children are welcome on all other tours.

 

Due to limited places all seats must be pre-booked

 

How to book a place on one of these railtours

 

Telephone: Brigg Tourist Information Centre on 01652 657053

 

E-mail: Bookings@afrps.co.uk

 

For further information telephone 01652 656661 or visit www.afrps.co.uk

 

A CHRISTMAS ALPHAPUZZLE by Chris Tyas

 

BELOW IS AN ALPHAPUZZLE WHICH CONTAINS LOCOMOTIVE NAMES BOTH STEAM AND DIESEL.  ALL THE LETTERS OF THE ALPHABET HAVE BEEN USED AND THREE STARTER LETTERS HAVE BEEN INCLUDED.

(I KNOW IT’S NOT SYMMETRICAL)

 

 

 

2

 

16

 

26

 

8

 

 

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12

26

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25

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26

19

 

5

 

5

 

15

 

25

 

 

19

 

 

 

17

8

5

18

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1

26

11

4

16

 

25

11

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18

 

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25

 

 

 

 

 

 

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1

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A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z

 

 

A bit of fun to keep you occupied over the Christmas and New Year.

 

Answers in next magazine.